Home > CAPEC List > CAPEC-628: Carry-Off GPS Attack (Version 2.9)  

CAPEC-628: Carry-Off GPS Attack

 
Carry-Off GPS Attack
Definition in a New Window Definition in a New Window
Attack Pattern ID: 628
Abstraction: Detailed
Status: Draft
Completeness: Stub
Presentation Filter:
+ Summary

A GPS spoofing attack attempts to deceive a GPS receiver by broadcasting counterfeit GPS signals, structured to resemble a set of normal GPS signals, or by rebroadcasting genuine signals captured elsewhere or at a different time. These spoofed signals may be modified in such a way as to cause the receiver to estimate its position to be somewhere other than where it actually is, or to be located where it is but at a different time, as determined by the attacker. One common form of a GPS spoofing attack, commonly termed a carry-off attack begins by broadcasting signals synchronized with the genuine signals observed by the target receiver. The power of the counterfeit signals is then gradually increased and drawn away from the genuine signals.

+ Examples-Instances

Description

A "proof-of-concept" attack was successfully performed in June, 2013, when the luxury yacht "White Rose" was misdirected with spoofed GPS signals from Monaco to the island of Rhodes by a group of aerospace engineering students from the Cockrell School of Engineering at the University of Texas in Austin. The students were aboard the yacht, allowing their spoofing equipment to gradually overpower the signal strengths of the actual GPS constellation satellites, altering the course of the yacht.

+ Attacker Skills or Knowledge Required

Skill or Knowledge Level: High

+ Attack Motivation-Consequences
ScopeTechnical ImpactNote
Other
+ Technical Context
Architectural Paradigms
Mobile
+ References
[R.628.1] [REF-106] "Wikipedia". GPS Spooking. The Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spoofing_attack#GPS_Spoofing>.
+ Content History
Submissions
SubmitterOrganizationDateSource
CAPEC Content TeamThe MITRE Corporation2015-11-09Internal_CAPEC_Team

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Page Last Updated or Reviewed: December 07, 2015